Fellowship Program

The division has an ACGME-accredited fellowship training program in pediatric endocrinology and diabetes. We accept one fellowship physician per year for three years of training. It is the goal of our fellowship training program to train pediatricians with an interest and potential for continuing in an academic medical career including continued involvement in research and teaching.

 Program Description
  • History: Program established in 2005
  • Duration: 3 Years
  • Prerequisite Training/Selection Criteria: Must have completed certified residency program
  • VISAS Accepted By MCW: J1, & H1B
  • VISAS Accepted By Program: J1

Goals & Objectives for Training

The broad educational goals of the program are to develop the knowledge, skills, and attributes that will allow the pediatric endocrine fellow to provide excellent care to children with endocrine disorders and diabetes mellitus. This will be accomplished by providing opportunities for direct inpatient, outpatient, and consultative patient care to patients with endocrine disorders and/or those referred for endocrinology consultation under the direct supervision of full-time faculty.

In addition, the program will train fellows to have the necessary knowledge, skills, and attributes  to pursue a career that will combine scholarly activity with clinical care. During all years of training, the fellow will have the opportunity to pursue clinical and/or laboratory-based research.

Instruction regarding study design, epidemiology, and biostatistics will be available through the research mentor, pediatric endocrine faculty, and the Joint Fellowship Curriculum, with the goal of training the fellow to be academically productive. Both within the section as well as in collaboration with other sections of the Department of Pediatrics, multiple scholarly opportunities exist. Under the supervision of a research mentor, the program will aim to develop the academic potential of the pediatric endocrine fellow. A summary of the goals of the training program will be distributed to each pediatric endocrine fellow and faculty member within the section, as well as to each research mentor on an annual basis.

Program Certifications

  • Nationally recognized/accredited diabetes program
  • USNWR nationally ranked clinical program in Endocrinology and Diabetes

Teaching Staff

  • 5 Board certified/board eligible pediatric endocrinologists
  • 6 certified advanced practice nurse practitioners
  • 3 research intensive basic science faculty

Patricia Donohoue, MD
Dr. Donohoue is the Section Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology. She has 25+ years experience as a pediatric endocrinologist.  She spends approximately 20 hours per week in Endocrine and Diabetes Clinics as well as staffing fellow clinics and newly diagnosed diabetic clinics. She spends 4 hours per month in Brain Tumor clinic. Though she has a special interest in inherited diseases of the endocrine system and disorders of sex differentiation, she treats patients with all types of endocrine problems.  While attending on the pediatric endocrinology service about 12 weeks per year, Dr. Donohoue will hold rounds seven days per week involving fellow education, training and supervision. She will attend the med/peds adult endocrine journal club for one hour per week, the pediatric endocrine clinical conference, and teaching conference for two hours every other week.

Bethany Auble, MD
Dr. Auble spends 5 hours per week in a general endocrine clinic, 5 hours per week in Diabetes clinic. She is attending on the inpatients wards for about 12 weeks each year. Dr. Auble will directly supervise the fellow in the care of inpatients, outpatients, and with consultations. While attending on the pediatric endocrinology service, Dr. Auble will hold rounds seven days per week, a time commitment of 10-12 hours weekly, involving fellow education, training and supervision. Though she has a special interest in polycystic ovarian syndrome of the endocrine system, she treats patients with all types of endocrine problems. She is a dedicated advocate for graduate medical education. She will attend the adult endocrine journal club for one hour per week, the pediatric endocrine clinical conference, and the pediatric endocrine teaching conference for 1 to 2 hours every week.

Susanne Cabrera, MD
Dr. Cabrera spends 5 hours per week in a general endocrine clinic, 5 hours per week in Diabetes clinic. She is attending on the inpatients wards for about 12 weeks each year. Dr. Cabrera will directly supervise the fellow in the care of inpatients, outpatients, and with consultations. While attending on the pediatric endocrinology service, Dr. Cabrera will hold rounds seven days per week, a time commitment of 10-12 hours weekly, involving fellow education, training and supervision. Though she has a special interest in disorders of sex differentiation, she treats patients with all types of endocrine problems. She will attend the adult endocrine journal club for one hour per week, the pediatric endocrine clinical conference, and the pediatric endocrine teaching conference for 1 to 2 hours every week.

David Wyatt, MD
Dr. Wyatt is the director of the Pediatric Translational Research Unit. He has had 25+ years experience as a pediatric endocrinologist. Over the last 20 years, he has been lead investigator for pharmaceutical-sponsored growth hormone-related research, having the distinction of running the largest center for growth hormone-related clinical trials in the country from 1985 to 1995. He continues to be active in clinical research and is the director of the Pediatric Translational Research Unit. He spends approximately 11 hours per week in a general endocrine clinic and 7 hours per week in Diabetes clinic. He is attending on the inpatient wards for 13 weeks each year. Dr Wyatt will directly supervise the fellow in the care of inpatients, outpatients, and with consultations. While attending on the pediatric endocrinology service, Dr Wyatt will hold rounds seven days per week. He will attend the pediatric endocrine clinical conference for one hour every other week and the pediatric endocrine teaching conference for one hour every other week.

Omar Ali, MD
Dr. Ali is active in both clinical duties and translational research. He spends approximately 7 hours per week in a general endocrine clinic and 7 hours per week in Diabetes clinic. He also conducts a lipid clinic twice a month. He is attending on the inpatient wards for 13 weeks each year. His research is focused on the genetics and epigenetics of obesity and the metabolic syndrome and he is currently the PI and co-investigator on two NIH-funded grants. He is also the local PI for the type 1 diabetes exchange study and supervises fellows on their research studies. Dr. Ali will directly supervise the fellow in the care of inpatients, outpatients, and with consultations. While attending on the pediatric endocrinology service, Dr. Ali will hold rounds seven days per week. He also supervises fellows' continuity clinics two times a month. He will attend the pediatric endocrine clinical conference for one hour every other week and the pediatric endocrine teaching conference for one hour every week. He also participates in teaching the fellows during regularly scheduled didactic teaching sessions for 3 months each year.

Alvina Kansra, MD
Dr. Kansra’s responsibilities will primarily consist of clinicals as she works on establishing her research and role as faculty. Her clinical schedules are to be developed. Her inpatient attending time will expand to match those of the other members of the section. Dr. Kansra will directly supervise the fellow in the care of inpatients, outpatients, and with consultations. She will attend the adult endocrine journal club for one hour per week, the monthly pediatric nurse practitioner case conference for one hour per month, the pediatric endocrine clinical conference for one hour every other week, and the pediatric endocrine teaching conference for one hour every other week.

 Curriculum

Clinical

The pediatric endocrine physician faculty members are directly responsible for all patient care. The pediatric endocrine fellow will be supervised at all times by a faculty member and will provide inpatient care, outpatient care, and consultative services on under direct supervision. Goals and objectives of each clinical rotation (as described by the six ACGME competencies) will be distributed to each pediatric endocrine fellow and faculty member within the section.

During the first year of training, the pediatric endocrine fellow will attend most of the outpatient clinics and be available for in-patient consultations most of the time. It is anticipated that the clinical exposure will be great, and under the direct supervision of faculty, the fellow will develop clinical expertise in the types of clinical problems cared for by practicing pediatric endocrinologists. Over the following 2 years, the fellow will have the opportunity of following patients longitudinally, under the supervision of experienced faculty, to gain a greater understanding of the chronic nature of the endocrine and diabetes-related disorders of childhood. In addition to patient-care experiences, the fellow will receive regular, didactic instruction regarding endocrine disorders and diabetes mellitus.

The pediatric endocrine fellows will have scheduled fellow’s endocrine continuity clinics, as well as fellow’s diabetes continuity clinics throughout the month. Patients new to our practice, or established patients interested in being followed by the pediatric endocrine fellow, will be scheduled into a designated clinic. A faculty member will directly supervise each of those clinics.

The first year pediatric endocrine fellow will be on call one half of the inpatient call per month, giving the fellow 2 full weekends free and 2 weeks free of night call, on average. All of the night and weekend call will be from home. On rare occasions, the fellow and attending may need to come into the hospital from home to evaluate a patient. The fellow will have the first month call free.

The second year fellow will be on night call for one week and take one weekend of call per month, on average. The third year fellow will be on night call for one week and take one weekend of call per month, on average. Holidays will be divided among the fellows, as per their preference. Third year fellows will also take 2-4 weeks of inpatient service divided between the beginning and end of the year.

As stated above, all call is in home call. The call does not change from rotation to rotation. The evening call will generally begin at 5 p.m. and end at 8 a.m. the following day, and from 4 p.m. Friday until 8 a.m. Monday morning.

Scholarly Activities

In addition to participating in a core curriculum in scholarly activities, all fellows will be expected to engage in projects in which they develop hypotheses or in projects of substantive scholarly exploration and analysis that require critical thinking. Areas in which scholarly activity may be pursued include, but are not limited to: basic, clinical, or translational biomedicine; health services; quality improvement; bioethics; education; and public policy. In addition to biomedical research, examples of acceptable activities might include a critical meta-analysis of the literature, a systematic review of clinical practice, a critical analysis of public policy, or a curriculum development project with an assessment component.

Work Product of Scholarly Activity

Involvement in scholarly activities must result in the generation of a specific written "work product" as outlined by the ABP. Examples of include, but are not limited to:

  • A peer-reviewed publication in which a fellow played a substantial role
  • An in-depth manuscript describing a completed project
  • A thesis or dissertation written in connection with the pursuit of an advanced degree
  • An extramural grant application that has either been accepted or favorably reviewed
  • A progress report for projects of exceptional complexity, such as a multi-year clinical trial

The fellow’s Scholarship Oversight Committee (SOC) will be instrumental in guiding the fellow’s activity towards an acceptable product. In addition to the work of the SOC, the department will provide all subspecialty fellows with the opportunity to participate in a departmental research, education, and scholarship forum to present their work product and receive feedback from department faculty.

Scholarship Oversight Committee (SOC)

The SOC in conjunction with the trainee, the mentor, and the program director will determine whether a specific activity is appropriate to meet the ABP guidelines for scholarly activities. These activities require active participation by the fellow and must be mentored. The mentor(s) will be responsible for providing the continuous ongoing feedback essential to the trainee’s development.

Review of scholarly activity and the written work product will occur at the local level with each fellow having a SOC responsible for overseeing and assessing the progress of each fellow and verifying for the ABP that the requirement has been met. The SOC must consist of three or more individuals, at least one of whom is based outside the subspecialty discipline; the fellowship program director may serve as a trainee’s mentor and participate in the activities of the oversight committee, but should not be a standing (i.e. voting) member. Particular emphasis will be placed on encouraging identification of committee members whose professional and research responsibilities encompass elements of the trainee’s scholarly interest, but who do not necessarily have a primary appointment in the Department of Pediatrics. Examples of such individuals include faculty in clinical departments in the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center (AHC), faculty in basic science departments, or faculty in the Schools of Public Health or Education.

This committee will:

  1. Determine whether a specific activity is appropriate to meet the ABP guidelines for scholarly activity.

  2. Provide guidance in charting a course of preparation beyond the core fellowship curriculum to ensure successful completion of the project.

  3. Evaluate the fellow's progress as related to scholarly activity.

  4. Meet with the fellow early in the training period (within 6 months of initiation of fellowship training) and regularly thereafter.

  5. Require the fellow to present/defend the project related to his/her scholarly activity.

  6. Advise the program director on the fellow's progress and assess whether the fellow has satisfactorily met the guidelines associated with the requirement for active participation in scholarly activities.

The fellow, in conjunction with the fellowship director or designee and research mentor, should identify the direction for the fellow’s scholarly activity. At the first SOC meeting, the purpose will be to hear the general path the fellow has chosen, to help further outline the path, and determine the specific steps for the fellow to meet the outlined path. The SOC should meet again within 4-6 months of the first meeting and at least semi-annually thereafter to further update and guide the fellow on developing their scholarly path.

A written report by the chair of each trainee's SOC should be completed twice a year and forwarded to the fellowship program director. The Department Education Office will provide the subspecialty training programs with standard forms for documenting each SOC meeting. The fellowship director and the head of the fellow's SOC are expected to monitor whether additional SOC meetings are necessary for fellows who need more help or may be changing their scholarly activity.

The final responsibility of the SOC is to review and approve the final scholarly “work product” of the applicant prior to submission to the ABP.

External Oversight

A program’s ability to provide a satisfactory scholarly experience for all trainees will be evaluated periodically, as described below.

  • The Pediatric Residency Review Committee (RRC) of the ACGME will be asked to review the training program’s structure as it relates to the scholarly activity requirements.

  • External periodic peer review of the quality of the training environment related to scholarly activity, in addition to that undertaken by the RRC, is highly recommended.

Responsibilities of the Training Program Director

In addition to meeting the requirements of the ACGME related to the six general competencies, the responsibilities of the training program director shall include the creation of a core curriculum in scholarly activities, the identification of a mentor, the creation of the Scholarship Oversight Committee responsible for overseeing and assessing the progress of each trainee, and providing verification to the ABP of the successful completion of training.

It is the responsibility of the training director to review the SOC documentation and clarify the responsibilities and outcomes for each fellow. The SOC and the Fellowship Program Director are both accountable for scholarly progress of individual fellows and will share their recommendations with the Department Chair.

Verification of Scholarly Activity

Upon completion of training, the ABP will require:

  • Verification from the training program director that the clinical and scholarly skills requirements have been met.

  • A comprehensive document (i.e. personal statement), written by the fellow, describing the scholarly activity that includes a description of his/her role in each aspect of the activity and how the scholarly activity relates to the trainee’s own career development plan.

  • The actual “work product” of the scholarly activity as described above.

  • Signature of the fellow, program director, and members of the Scholarship Oversight Committee on both the personal statement and work product of the fellow as described above>

The fellow will need to produce the work product and personal statement, as well as obtain approval from the SOC to be eligible to sit for the Subspecialty Board Examination. The decision about the adequacy of the work product is the responsibility of the SOC and the program director.

 Application Process

Our 3-year fellowship program is ACGME accredited and begins on July 1 each year. We accept one fellow each academic year through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Applications from prospective applicants are accepted from November through January via the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS).

Complete applications should include the following:

  • ERAS application form
  • At least 3 letters of reference including Program Director letter
  • Medical Student Performance Evaluation/Dean's Letter
  • Curriculum Vitae
  • Personal statement
  • USMLE scores - Steps 1, 2, and 3
  • ECFMG certificate for foreign medical school graduates (see visa information below)

Our program currently accept the following visas:

  • Permanent Resident Visa
  • Visitor Exchange Visa sponsored by ECFMG (J-1)
  • For additional visa information please visit Graduate Medical Education.
 Endocrine Case Conferences

This is a weekly conference in which Pediatric and Adult Endocrinology cases are presented and discussed. Our target audience is MCW and Community Endocrine Faculty and Fellows, as well as Primary Care Physicians and Advanced Practice Nurses who see patients with endocrine and metabolic disorders. This conference takes place every Thursday morning.

 Terms, Conditions & Benefits of Employment

At MCW/Children’s Hospital we believe in providing employees with opportunities for professional and personal growth. Fellows starting the program prior to July 1, 2015, are employed by the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW).

Stipend amounts for the 2013-2014 Academic Year

  • PGY1 - $55,250
  • PGY2 - $56,250
  • PGY3 - $57,250
  • PGY4 - $58,250
  • PGY5 - $61,250
  • PGY6 - $63,250
  • PGY7 - $65,250

Benefits

  • Health, Dental, Vision, and Life Insurance
  • 403(b) Retirement Plan
  • Vacation – 22 days per academic year
  • Holiday & Floating Holidays
  • Sick Leave
  • Tuition Reimbursement
  • Dependent Care Reimbursement
  • Health Flexible Spending Account
  • Short-Term Disability and Long-Term Disability

See MCW Benefits for detailed information.

Professional Liability

The MCW Professional Risk Management Department coordinates the professional liability self-insurance program and assures liability coverage with the Wisconsin Injured Patients and Families Compensation Fund in excess of the primary annual limits of $1,000,000 per incident and $3,000,000 in the aggregate. Providers are covered for activities within the scope of duties for MCW.

Fellows starting the program on or after July 1, 2015, are employed by the Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals (MCWAH).

The Medical College of Wisconsin Affiliated Hospitals, Inc. (MCWAH) offers an excellent comprehensive benefits package.

Please use the following link to access information about the terms, conditions and benefits of employment: MCWAH Benefits, Conditions & Terms of Employment for information regarding vacations, leaves, insurance, stipends and professional liability.

 Evaluation

The pediatric endocrine fellows and faculty will perform annual reviews of the training program, including whether the goals and objectives are being met. The comments will be collated and discussed at an annual meeting including the faculty and pediatric endocrine fellows to discuss these concerns. Changes to the goals, objectives, or curriculum may be implemented when necessary based on feedback received at these review sessions.

  • Evaluation of fellows by faculty
  • Evaluation of faculty by fellows bi-annually
  • Evaluation of program by faculty, staff, and fellows annually

Fellowship Contact Information

Felesia A. Martin
Pediatric Endocrinology Fellowship Program Coordinator
(414) 266-6750

Medical College of Wisconsin
Children's Hospital of Wisconsin
9000 W. Wisconsin Ave.
Milwaukee, WI 53201

Pediatrics Endocrinology Site Map

Medical College of Wisconsin
8701 Watertown Plank Road
Milwaukee, WI 53226
(414) 955-8296
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Page Updated 02/26/2015
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